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Date: 13 Feb 2009 07:02:25
From:
Subject: American Serena Williams against new drug-testing rules in tennis
PARIS =97 Serena Williams has joined the chorus of top tennis players
who believe new anti-doping measures on athletes are too strong.

The top-ranked American said the rules implemented by the
International Tennis Federation and World Anti-Doping Agency were
"over the top."

"I think it's too much," the Australian Open champion said after
beating Karolina Sprem 6-1, 6-2 on Thursday in the second round at the
Open GDF Suez in Paris. "It's very invasive. . . . Basically, they
show up at your house on any day."

Under the latest WADA code, athletes must specify one hour each day
when and where they can be located for testing. Athletes must also
tell anti-doping authorities where they will be over the next three
months, but they can update this by e-mail or phone message at short
notice if it changes.

Top-ranked Rafael Nadal has been one of the most outspoken critics,
insisting that forcing top athletes to be available one hour a day for
testing amounted to intolerable harassment. In Belgium, 65 athletes
even filed a court challenge.

At the ABN Amro tournament in Rotterdam, Netherlands, this week, Nadal
said players feel like "criminals" because of the new measures, which
were ratified last year by the ITF board of directors.

Fourth-ranked Andy Murray has also spoken out against the rule, but
No. 2-ranked Roger Federer said he was fine with it when he was at the
Australian Open. The 13-time Grand Slam champion admitted it was a
tough system, but added "I know it's a pain, but I would like it to be
a clean sport, and that's why I'm OK with it."

Williams also said the new measures were going to be tough to follow.

"I jump from city to city all the time. First of all, I never tell
people where I am because I like to do my own thing," Williams said.

"It's definitely the purest sport, that's the only upside to it,"
Williams added. "We won't have problems in tennis that we have in
other sports."




 
Date: 13 Feb 2009 23:19:17
From: Fan
Subject: Re: American Serena Williams against new drug-testing rules in tennis
On Feb 14, 4:12=A0am, amy <amy.lynn1...@yahoo.com > wrote:
> On Feb 13, 11:27=A0am, zepflo...@yahoo.com wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
> > On Feb 13, 9:02=A0am, Aranci...@selin.com wrote:
>
> > > PARIS =97 Serena Williams has joined the chorus of top tennis players
> > > who believe new anti-doping measures on athletes are too strong.
>
> > > The top-ranked American said the rules implemented by the
> > > International Tennis Federation and World Anti-Doping Agency were
> > > "over the top."
>
> > > "I think it's too much," the Australian Open champion said after
> > > beating Karolina Sprem 6-1, 6-2 on Thursday in the second round at th=
e
> > > Open GDF Suez in Paris. "It's very invasive. . . . Basically, they
> > > show up at your house on any day."
>
> > > Under the latest WADA code, athletes must specify one hour each day
> > > when and where they can be located for testing. Athletes must also
> > > tell anti-doping authorities where they will be over the next three
> > > months, but they can update this by e-mail or phone message at short
> > > notice if it changes.
>
> > > Top-ranked Rafael Nadal has been one of the most outspoken critics,
> > > insisting that forcing top athletes to be available one hour a day fo=
r
> > > testing amounted to intolerable harassment. In Belgium, 65 athletes
> > > even filed a court challenge.
>
> > > At the ABN Amro tournament in Rotterdam, Netherlands, this week, Nada=
l
> > > said players feel like "criminals" because of the new measures, which
> > > were ratified last year by the ITF board of directors.
>
> > > Fourth-ranked Andy Murray has also spoken out against the rule, but
> > > No. 2-ranked Roger Federer said he was fine with it when he was at th=
e
> > > Australian Open. The 13-time Grand Slam champion admitted it was a
> > > tough system, but added "I know it's a pain, but I would like it to b=
e
> > > a clean sport, and that's why I'm OK with it."
>
> > > Williams also said the new measures were going to be tough to follow.
>
> > > "I jump from city to city all the time. First of all, I never tell
> > > people where I am because I like to do my own thing," Williams said.
>
> > > "It's definitely the purest sport, that's the only upside to it,"
> > > Williams added. "We won't have problems in tennis that we have in
> > > other sports."
>
> > If there is any doubt she is taking steroids...- Hide quoted text -
>
> > - Show quoted text -
>
> raja hates black people, black music and all things black

Correct! It is one of the ugly racist sides of some, not all; brown
and yellow people. It seems that they try to snuggle closer to whites
with anti-black racism. Fortunately, not all of them are like that but
enough of them to make me cringe whenever I see one of them start with
their ugly anti-black racism.

Raja is a nasty racist monkey :-(



 
Date: 13 Feb 2009 20:51:03
From: drew
Subject: Re: American Serena Williams against new drug-testing rules in tennis
On Feb 13, 6:41=A0pm, Superdave <the.big.rst.kah...@gmail.com > wrote:
> On Fri, 13 Feb 2009 09:51:11 -0800 (PST), drew <d...@technologist.com>
> wrote:
>
>
>
> >On Feb 13, 10:02 am, Aranci...@selin.com wrote:
> >> PARIS =97 Serena Williams has joined the chorus of top tennis players
> >> who believe new anti-doping measures on athletes are too strong.
>
> >> The top-ranked American said the rules implemented by the
> >> International Tennis Federation and World Anti-Doping Agency were
> >> "over the top."
>
> >> "I think it's too much," the Australian Open champion said after
> >> beating Karolina Sprem 6-1, 6-2 on Thursday in the second round at the
> >> Open GDF Suez in Paris. "It's very invasive. . . . Basically, they
> >> show up at your house on any day."
>
> >> Under the latest WADA code, athletes must specify one hour each day
> >> when and where they can be located for testing. Athletes must also
> >> tell anti-doping authorities where they will be over the next three
> >> months, but they can update this by e-mail or phone message at short
> >> notice if it changes.
>
> >> Top-ranked Rafael Nadal has been one of the most outspoken critics,
> >> insisting that forcing top athletes to be available one hour a day for
> >> testing amounted to intolerable harassment. In Belgium, 65 athletes
> >> even filed a court challenge.
>
> >> At the ABN Amro tournament in Rotterdam, Netherlands, this week, Nadal
> >> said players feel like "criminals" because of the new measures, which
> >> were ratified last year by the ITF board of directors.
>
> >> Fourth-ranked Andy Murray has also spoken out against the rule, but
> >> No. 2-ranked Roger Federer said he was fine with it when he was at the
> >> Australian Open. The 13-time Grand Slam champion admitted it was a
> >> tough system, but added "I know it's a pain, but I would like it to be
> >> a clean sport, and that's why I'm OK with it."
>
> >> Williams also said the new measures were going to be tough to follow.
>
> >> "I jump from city to city all the time. First of all, I never tell
> >> people where I am because I like to do my own thing," Williams said.
>
> >> "It's definitely the purest sport, that's the only upside to it,"
> >> Williams added. "We won't have problems in tennis that we have in
> >> other sports."
>
> >Once you have to create the tennis Gestapo to ensure drug testing
> >compliance, the lights should come on and the realization that this is
> >too much should be apparent to reasonable people.
>
> >The players who complain run the risk of being labelled potential drug
> >cheats but I see it differently. =A0The fact remains that a player
> >determined to beat drug tests will beat the drug tests. =A0It wouldn't
> >matter if one of thse fascists would be sleeping in the same house as
> >the tennis player and travelling with him.
>
> >The players are right to protest. =A0There comes a time when your time
> >should be your own and you must be allowed this freedom. =A0They are
> >treating these players like commodities, not people.
>
> Nadal has no problem breaking the rules and cheating. He has proven
> this so juicing is just another rule to be broken as far as he is
> concerned.

I don't believe that he's on the juice but if he is it shouldn't
surprise anybody. Every athlete is out there trying his hardest to
stay fit and stay injury free.

If there is something that will help him to achieve these goals he'll
be tempted. If he knows he can use something and there is no way
he'll be caught by the current rules, he'll use. That isn't cynical,
it's common sense.

If you are a competitor you will look for an edge, any edge and you'll
not assume that your opposition isn't thinking the same way.

This isn't weekend doubles folks, this is the big time.


  
Date: 14 Feb 2009 11:37:47
From: One
Subject: Re: American Serena Williams against new drug-testing rules in tennis
drew <drew@technologist.com > wrote in
news:dcd83dee-2b3e-439d-9c5d-b5e11c85f3e4@r24g2000vbp.googlegroups.com:

> This isn't weekend doubles folks, this is the big time.

Which is why adhering to the new rules should not be too much of a
hardship.


 
Date: 13 Feb 2009 19:12:26
From: amy
Subject: Re: American Serena Williams against new drug-testing rules in tennis
On Feb 13, 11:27=A0am, zepflo...@yahoo.com wrote:
> On Feb 13, 9:02=A0am, Aranci...@selin.com wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
> > PARIS =97 Serena Williams has joined the chorus of top tennis players
> > who believe new anti-doping measures on athletes are too strong.
>
> > The top-ranked American said the rules implemented by the
> > International Tennis Federation and World Anti-Doping Agency were
> > "over the top."
>
> > "I think it's too much," the Australian Open champion said after
> > beating Karolina Sprem 6-1, 6-2 on Thursday in the second round at the
> > Open GDF Suez in Paris. "It's very invasive. . . . Basically, they
> > show up at your house on any day."
>
> > Under the latest WADA code, athletes must specify one hour each day
> > when and where they can be located for testing. Athletes must also
> > tell anti-doping authorities where they will be over the next three
> > months, but they can update this by e-mail or phone message at short
> > notice if it changes.
>
> > Top-ranked Rafael Nadal has been one of the most outspoken critics,
> > insisting that forcing top athletes to be available one hour a day for
> > testing amounted to intolerable harassment. In Belgium, 65 athletes
> > even filed a court challenge.
>
> > At the ABN Amro tournament in Rotterdam, Netherlands, this week, Nadal
> > said players feel like "criminals" because of the new measures, which
> > were ratified last year by the ITF board of directors.
>
> > Fourth-ranked Andy Murray has also spoken out against the rule, but
> > No. 2-ranked Roger Federer said he was fine with it when he was at the
> > Australian Open. The 13-time Grand Slam champion admitted it was a
> > tough system, but added "I know it's a pain, but I would like it to be
> > a clean sport, and that's why I'm OK with it."
>
> > Williams also said the new measures were going to be tough to follow.
>
> > "I jump from city to city all the time. First of all, I never tell
> > people where I am because I like to do my own thing," Williams said.
>
> > "It's definitely the purest sport, that's the only upside to it,"
> > Williams added. "We won't have problems in tennis that we have in
> > other sports."
>
> If there is any doubt she is taking steroids...- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

raja hates black people, black music and all things black


 
Date: 13 Feb 2009 10:29:56
From:
Subject: Re: American Serena Williams against new drug-testing rules in tennis
On Feb 13, 12:27=A0pm, zepflo...@yahoo.com wrote:
> On Feb 13, 9:02=A0am, Aranci...@selin.com wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
> > PARIS =97 Serena Williams has joined the chorus of top tennis players
> > who believe new anti-doping measures on athletes are too strong.
>
> > The top-ranked American said the rules implemented by the
> > International Tennis Federation and World Anti-Doping Agency were
> > "over the top."
>
> > "I think it's too much," the Australian Open champion said after
> > beating Karolina Sprem 6-1, 6-2 on Thursday in the second round at the
> > Open GDF Suez in Paris. "It's very invasive. . . . Basically, they
> > show up at your house on any day."
>
> > Under the latest WADA code, athletes must specify one hour each day
> > when and where they can be located for testing. Athletes must also
> > tell anti-doping authorities where they will be over the next three
> > months, but they can update this by e-mail or phone message at short
> > notice if it changes.
>
> > Top-ranked Rafael Nadal has been one of the most outspoken critics,
> > insisting that forcing top athletes to be available one hour a day for
> > testing amounted to intolerable harassment. In Belgium, 65 athletes
> > even filed a court challenge.
>
> > At the ABN Amro tournament in Rotterdam, Netherlands, this week, Nadal
> > said players feel like "criminals" because of the new measures, which
> > were ratified last year by the ITF board of directors.
>
> > Fourth-ranked Andy Murray has also spoken out against the rule, but
> > No. 2-ranked Roger Federer said he was fine with it when he was at the
> > Australian Open. The 13-time Grand Slam champion admitted it was a
> > tough system, but added "I know it's a pain, but I would like it to be
> > a clean sport, and that's why I'm OK with it."
>
> > Williams also said the new measures were going to be tough to follow.
>
> > "I jump from city to city all the time. First of all, I never tell
> > people where I am because I like to do my own thing," Williams said.
>
> > "It's definitely the purest sport, that's the only upside to it,"
> > Williams added. "We won't have problems in tennis that we have in
> > other sports."
>
> If there is any doubt she is taking steroids...


Oh just by looking at her you can tell she is taking steroids.... She
looks like a man.......


  
Date: 13 Feb 2009 19:46:59
From: One
Subject: Re: American Serena Williams against new drug-testing rules in tennis
Federer has no problem with it. And neither do athletes, cyclists and
people in other sports. Seems like there are some very worried tennis
players out there...



 
Date: 13 Feb 2009 09:51:11
From: drew
Subject: Re: American Serena Williams against new drug-testing rules in tennis
On Feb 13, 10:02 am, Aranci...@selin.com wrote:
> PARIS =97 Serena Williams has joined the chorus of top tennis players
> who believe new anti-doping measures on athletes are too strong.
>
> The top-ranked American said the rules implemented by the
> International Tennis Federation and World Anti-Doping Agency were
> "over the top."
>
> "I think it's too much," the Australian Open champion said after
> beating Karolina Sprem 6-1, 6-2 on Thursday in the second round at the
> Open GDF Suez in Paris. "It's very invasive. . . . Basically, they
> show up at your house on any day."
>
> Under the latest WADA code, athletes must specify one hour each day
> when and where they can be located for testing. Athletes must also
> tell anti-doping authorities where they will be over the next three
> months, but they can update this by e-mail or phone message at short
> notice if it changes.
>
> Top-ranked Rafael Nadal has been one of the most outspoken critics,
> insisting that forcing top athletes to be available one hour a day for
> testing amounted to intolerable harassment. In Belgium, 65 athletes
> even filed a court challenge.
>
> At the ABN Amro tournament in Rotterdam, Netherlands, this week, Nadal
> said players feel like "criminals" because of the new measures, which
> were ratified last year by the ITF board of directors.
>
> Fourth-ranked Andy Murray has also spoken out against the rule, but
> No. 2-ranked Roger Federer said he was fine with it when he was at the
> Australian Open. The 13-time Grand Slam champion admitted it was a
> tough system, but added "I know it's a pain, but I would like it to be
> a clean sport, and that's why I'm OK with it."
>
> Williams also said the new measures were going to be tough to follow.
>
> "I jump from city to city all the time. First of all, I never tell
> people where I am because I like to do my own thing," Williams said.
>
> "It's definitely the purest sport, that's the only upside to it,"
> Williams added. "We won't have problems in tennis that we have in
> other sports."

Once you have to create the tennis Gestapo to ensure drug testing
compliance, the lights should come on and the realization that this is
too much should be apparent to reasonable people.

The players who complain run the risk of being labelled potential drug
cheats but I see it differently. The fact remains that a player
determined to beat drug tests will beat the drug tests. It wouldn't
matter if one of thse fascists would be sleeping in the same house as
the tennis player and travelling with him.

The players are right to protest. There comes a time when your time
should be your own and you must be allowed this freedom. They are
treating these players like commodities, not people.



  
Date: 13 Feb 2009 23:41:49
From: Superdave
Subject: Re: American Serena Williams against new drug-testing rules in tennis
On Fri, 13 Feb 2009 09:51:11 -0800 (PST), drew <drew@technologist.com >
wrote:

>On Feb 13, 10:02 am, Aranci...@selin.com wrote:
>> PARIS Serena Williams has joined the chorus of top tennis players
>> who believe new anti-doping measures on athletes are too strong.
>>
>> The top-ranked American said the rules implemented by the
>> International Tennis Federation and World Anti-Doping Agency were
>> "over the top."
>>
>> "I think it's too much," the Australian Open champion said after
>> beating Karolina Sprem 6-1, 6-2 on Thursday in the second round at the
>> Open GDF Suez in Paris. "It's very invasive. . . . Basically, they
>> show up at your house on any day."
>>
>> Under the latest WADA code, athletes must specify one hour each day
>> when and where they can be located for testing. Athletes must also
>> tell anti-doping authorities where they will be over the next three
>> months, but they can update this by e-mail or phone message at short
>> notice if it changes.
>>
>> Top-ranked Rafael Nadal has been one of the most outspoken critics,
>> insisting that forcing top athletes to be available one hour a day for
>> testing amounted to intolerable harassment. In Belgium, 65 athletes
>> even filed a court challenge.
>>
>> At the ABN Amro tournament in Rotterdam, Netherlands, this week, Nadal
>> said players feel like "criminals" because of the new measures, which
>> were ratified last year by the ITF board of directors.
>>
>> Fourth-ranked Andy Murray has also spoken out against the rule, but
>> No. 2-ranked Roger Federer said he was fine with it when he was at the
>> Australian Open. The 13-time Grand Slam champion admitted it was a
>> tough system, but added "I know it's a pain, but I would like it to be
>> a clean sport, and that's why I'm OK with it."
>>
>> Williams also said the new measures were going to be tough to follow.
>>
>> "I jump from city to city all the time. First of all, I never tell
>> people where I am because I like to do my own thing," Williams said.
>>
>> "It's definitely the purest sport, that's the only upside to it,"
>> Williams added. "We won't have problems in tennis that we have in
>> other sports."
>
>Once you have to create the tennis Gestapo to ensure drug testing
>compliance, the lights should come on and the realization that this is
>too much should be apparent to reasonable people.
>
>The players who complain run the risk of being labelled potential drug
>cheats but I see it differently. The fact remains that a player
>determined to beat drug tests will beat the drug tests. It wouldn't
>matter if one of thse fascists would be sleeping in the same house as
>the tennis player and travelling with him.
>
>The players are right to protest. There comes a time when your time
>should be your own and you must be allowed this freedom. They are
>treating these players like commodities, not people.

Nadal has no problem breaking the rules and cheating. He has proven
this so juicing is just another rule to be broken as far as he is
concerned.


 
Date: 13 Feb 2009 09:37:44
From: Fan
Subject: Re: American Serena Williams against new drug-testing rules in tennis
On Feb 13, 6:27=A0pm, zepflo...@yahoo.com wrote:
> On Feb 13, 9:02=A0am, Aranci...@selin.com wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
> > PARIS =97 Serena Williams has joined the chorus of top tennis players
> > who believe new anti-doping measures on athletes are too strong.
>
> > The top-ranked American said the rules implemented by the
> > International Tennis Federation and World Anti-Doping Agency were
> > "over the top."
>
> > "I think it's too much," the Australian Open champion said after
> > beating Karolina Sprem 6-1, 6-2 on Thursday in the second round at the
> > Open GDF Suez in Paris. "It's very invasive. . . . Basically, they
> > show up at your house on any day."
>
> > Under the latest WADA code, athletes must specify one hour each day
> > when and where they can be located for testing. Athletes must also
> > tell anti-doping authorities where they will be over the next three
> > months, but they can update this by e-mail or phone message at short
> > notice if it changes.
>
> > Top-ranked Rafael Nadal has been one of the most outspoken critics,
> > insisting that forcing top athletes to be available one hour a day for
> > testing amounted to intolerable harassment. In Belgium, 65 athletes
> > even filed a court challenge.
>
> > At the ABN Amro tournament in Rotterdam, Netherlands, this week, Nadal
> > said players feel like "criminals" because of the new measures, which
> > were ratified last year by the ITF board of directors.
>
> > Fourth-ranked Andy Murray has also spoken out against the rule, but
> > No. 2-ranked Roger Federer said he was fine with it when he was at the
> > Australian Open. The 13-time Grand Slam champion admitted it was a
> > tough system, but added "I know it's a pain, but I would like it to be
> > a clean sport, and that's why I'm OK with it."
>
> > Williams also said the new measures were going to be tough to follow.
>
> > "I jump from city to city all the time. First of all, I never tell
> > people where I am because I like to do my own thing," Williams said.
>
> > "It's definitely the purest sport, that's the only upside to it,"
> > Williams added. "We won't have problems in tennis that we have in
> > other sports."
>
> If there is any doubt she is taking steroids...

Have a banana racist monkey...


 
Date: 13 Feb 2009 09:27:27
From:
Subject: Re: American Serena Williams against new drug-testing rules in tennis
On Feb 13, 9:02=A0am, Aranci...@selin.com wrote:
> PARIS =97 Serena Williams has joined the chorus of top tennis players
> who believe new anti-doping measures on athletes are too strong.
>
> The top-ranked American said the rules implemented by the
> International Tennis Federation and World Anti-Doping Agency were
> "over the top."
>
> "I think it's too much," the Australian Open champion said after
> beating Karolina Sprem 6-1, 6-2 on Thursday in the second round at the
> Open GDF Suez in Paris. "It's very invasive. . . . Basically, they
> show up at your house on any day."
>
> Under the latest WADA code, athletes must specify one hour each day
> when and where they can be located for testing. Athletes must also
> tell anti-doping authorities where they will be over the next three
> months, but they can update this by e-mail or phone message at short
> notice if it changes.
>
> Top-ranked Rafael Nadal has been one of the most outspoken critics,
> insisting that forcing top athletes to be available one hour a day for
> testing amounted to intolerable harassment. In Belgium, 65 athletes
> even filed a court challenge.
>
> At the ABN Amro tournament in Rotterdam, Netherlands, this week, Nadal
> said players feel like "criminals" because of the new measures, which
> were ratified last year by the ITF board of directors.
>
> Fourth-ranked Andy Murray has also spoken out against the rule, but
> No. 2-ranked Roger Federer said he was fine with it when he was at the
> Australian Open. The 13-time Grand Slam champion admitted it was a
> tough system, but added "I know it's a pain, but I would like it to be
> a clean sport, and that's why I'm OK with it."
>
> Williams also said the new measures were going to be tough to follow.
>
> "I jump from city to city all the time. First of all, I never tell
> people where I am because I like to do my own thing," Williams said.
>
> "It's definitely the purest sport, that's the only upside to it,"
> Williams added. "We won't have problems in tennis that we have in
> other sports."

If there is any doubt she is taking steroids...