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Date: 16 Dec 2008 08:41:13
From: Jason Catlin
Subject: Most distinctive, *mimicable* strokes of Open Era
In his impersonations, Djoke was great at capturing all the mannerisms
of the various top players.

But I've noticed there is typically something very distinctive and
unique and for lack of a better word "mimicable" about the way the top
players hit the tennis ball. They have a style all their own that
distinguishes them from the rest, even if accusations that we're in a
"cookie-cutter" era have validity.

So, some of the players I think have or have had a one-of-a-kind style
about them when they play tennis and ones that I could most easily
imitate if I became possessed by some Djoke impulse:

Borg (especially his backhand)
Connors (just about everything but especially his almost neurotic
footwork and racquet preparation)
Mac (serve, groundies, volleys, just about everything)
Edberg (serve, split-stepping, groundies, extended follow through on
backhand, takeback on f/h)
Lendl ("flying elbow" on the forehand, serve, again very neurotic so
lots of tics there to imitate)
Becker (really unique style of doing everything)
Hewitt (incredibly neurotic with so many tics, but his serve and
groundies are very mimicable)
Fed (his *beautiful/narcissistic* flowing game, every shot lends
itself to an unsuccessful chance for imitation
Nadal (forehand, crazy open-stance slides on backhand side)
Sampras (serve is the signature, but also groundies)
Wilander (serve, extended follow-through on groundies
Kafelnikov (very distinctive serve and groundies)

By the way, one of the notable people absent is Agassi. There was
something unique about his serve but his groundies I find less
mimicable for some reason

Other players I've watched play a million times but wouldn't be able
to mimic well: Roddick (except maybe the serve), Safin, Djokovic
(except maybe how he has to contort his mouth in a weird way when
hitting every forehand ;-))

Laver was before my time so I can't say anything about him or the
other players from late 60s, early 70s.





 
Date: 17 Dec 2008 04:25:21
From: Rodjk #613
Subject: Re: Most distinctive, *mimicable* strokes of Open Era
On Dec 17, 1:42=A0am, MBDunc <micha...@mail.suomi.net > wrote:
> On 17 joulu, 06:40, Jason Catlin <jason-cat...@hotmail.com> wrote:
>
>
>
> > On Dec 16, 11:10=A0pm, "Stapler" <stap...@tmp.com> wrote:
>
> > > andrew.r...@gmail.com wrote:
> > > > On Dec 16, 8:56 am, mimus <tinmimu...@hotmail.com> wrote:
> > > >> On Tue, 16 Dec 2008 08:41:13 -0800, Jason Catlin wrote:
> > > >>> In his impersonations, Djoke was great at capturing all the
> > > >>> mannerisms of the various top players.
>
> > > >> His imitation of Sharapova sucked.
>
> > > >> --
>
> > > >> Take a deep breath, take a walk, cool off, plot a bit, and serve
> > > >> again.
>
> > > > His Federer imitation was beautiful.
>
> > > It's impossible to imitate Roger's beautiful flowing game~~~
>
> > It was obvious that Djoke wasn't trying to do a real imitation of
> > Roger's strokes, which he could've done.
>
> > His goal was to disrespect him by making his strokes look feminine or
> > whatever, probably because his coach
> > has been telling him that the reason Roger was so dominant was because
> > players like Blake, Ljubo, etc. were too much in awe of him.
>
> Awe of Federer is similar Borg and Sampras had. All those greats won a
> lot of matches already in locker room.
>
> "Everyone knows this is Borg Open, not French Open" - Gerulaitis
> during FO 1980.
> "I specially thank Sampras' (absence) for this title" - Kafelnikov
> after AO 1999 final (Sampras skipped AO 1999).
>
> .mikko

I remember Gomez being asked what it was that made the difference in
his title run to the French Open.
He said that Lendl's absence that year was the biggest factor.

Rodjk #613


 
Date: 17 Dec 2008 11:23:24
From: Iceberg
Subject: Re: Most distinctive, *mimicable* strokes of Open Era
"Jason Catlin" <jason-catlin@hotmail.com > wrote in message
news:524ac92c-03ea-4fc0-b488-70cdd8e59499@l33g2000pri.googlegroups.com...
> In his impersonations, Djoke was great at capturing all the mannerisms
> of the various top players.
>
> But I've noticed there is typically something very distinctive and
> unique and for lack of a better word "mimicable" about the way the top
> players hit the tennis ball. They have a style all their own that
> distinguishes them from the rest, even if accusations that we're in a
> "cookie-cutter" era have validity.
>
> So, some of the players I think have or have had a one-of-a-kind style
> about them when they play tennis and ones that I could most easily
> imitate if I became possessed by some Djoke impulse:
>
> Borg (especially his backhand)
> Connors (just about everything but especially his almost neurotic
> footwork and racquet preparation)
> Mac (serve, groundies, volleys, just about everything)
> Edberg (serve, split-stepping, groundies, extended follow through on
> backhand, takeback on f/h)
> Lendl ("flying elbow" on the forehand, serve, again very neurotic so
> lots of tics there to imitate)
> Becker (really unique style of doing everything)
> Hewitt (incredibly neurotic with so many tics, but his serve and
> groundies are very mimicable)
> Fed (his *beautiful/narcissistic* flowing game, every shot lends
> itself to an unsuccessful chance for imitation
> Nadal (forehand, crazy open-stance slides on backhand side)
> Sampras (serve is the signature, but also groundies)
> Wilander (serve, extended follow-through on groundies
> Kafelnikov (very distinctive serve and groundies)
>
> By the way, one of the notable people absent is Agassi. There was
> something unique about his serve but his groundies I find less
> mimicable for some reason
>
> Other players I've watched play a million times but wouldn't be able
> to mimic well: Roddick (except maybe the serve), Safin, Djokovic
> (except maybe how he has to contort his mouth in a weird way when
> hitting every forehand ;-))
>
> Laver was before my time so I can't say anything about him or the
> other players from late 60s, early 70s.

Gasquet backhand is very mimicable




 
Date: 17 Dec 2008 09:54:09
From: Roger That
Subject: Re: Most distinctive, *mimicable* strokes of Open Era
Jason Catlin a écrit :
> Other players I've watched play a million times but wouldn't be able
> to mimic well: Roddick (except maybe the serve)

I think that Roddick's very stiff backhand should not be hard to mimic.


  
Date: 17 Dec 2008 14:32:45
From: mimus
Subject: Re: Most distinctive, *mimicable* strokes of Open Era
On Wed, 17 Dec 2008 09:54:09 +0100, Roger That wrote:

> Jason Catlin a écrit :
>
>> Other players I've watched play a million times but wouldn't be able
>> to mimic well: Roddick (except maybe the serve)
>
> I think that Roddick's very stiff backhand should not be hard to mimic.

Especially with a frying-pan.

--

Take a deep breath, take a walk, cool off, plot a bit, and serve again.



 
Date: 16 Dec 2008 23:42:36
From: MBDunc
Subject: Re: Most distinctive, *mimicable* strokes of Open Era
On 17 joulu, 06:40, Jason Catlin <jason-cat...@hotmail.com > wrote:
> On Dec 16, 11:10=A0pm, "Stapler" <stap...@tmp.com> wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
> > andrew.r...@gmail.com wrote:
> > > On Dec 16, 8:56 am, mimus <tinmimu...@hotmail.com> wrote:
> > >> On Tue, 16 Dec 2008 08:41:13 -0800, Jason Catlin wrote:
> > >>> In his impersonations, Djoke was great at capturing all the
> > >>> mannerisms of the various top players.
>
> > >> His imitation of Sharapova sucked.
>
> > >> --
>
> > >> Take a deep breath, take a walk, cool off, plot a bit, and serve
> > >> again.
>
> > > His Federer imitation was beautiful.
>
> > It's impossible to imitate Roger's beautiful flowing game~~~
>
> It was obvious that Djoke wasn't trying to do a real imitation of
> Roger's strokes, which he could've done.
>
> His goal was to disrespect him by making his strokes look feminine or
> whatever, probably because his coach
> has been telling him that the reason Roger was so dominant was because
> players like Blake, Ljubo, etc. were too much in awe of him.

Awe of Federer is similar Borg and Sampras had. All those greats won a
lot of matches already in locker room.

"Everyone knows this is Borg Open, not French Open" - Gerulaitis
during FO 1980.
"I specially thank Sampras' (absence) for this title" - Kafelnikov
after AO 1999 final (Sampras skipped AO 1999).

.mikko



  
Date: 17 Dec 2008 10:36:43
From: Stapler
Subject: Re: Most distinctive, *mimicable* strokes of Open Era
MBDunc wrote:
> "Everyone knows this is Borg Open, not French Open" - Gerulaitis
> during FO 1980.
> "I specially thank Sampras' (absence) for this title" - Kafelnikov
> after AO 1999 final (Sampras skipped AO 1999).
>
> .mikko

So I guess we can call the 2009 FO the Nadal Open.




 
Date: 16 Dec 2008 20:40:32
From: Jason Catlin
Subject: Re: Most distinctive, *mimicable* strokes of Open Era
On Dec 16, 11:10=A0pm, "Stapler" <stap...@tmp.com > wrote:
> andrew.r...@gmail.com wrote:
> > On Dec 16, 8:56 am, mimus <tinmimu...@hotmail.com> wrote:
> >> On Tue, 16 Dec 2008 08:41:13 -0800, Jason Catlin wrote:
> >>> In his impersonations, Djoke was great at capturing all the
> >>> mannerisms of the various top players.
>
> >> His imitation of Sharapova sucked.
>
> >> --
>
> >> Take a deep breath, take a walk, cool off, plot a bit, and serve
> >> again.
>
> > His Federer imitation was beautiful.
>
> It's impossible to imitate Roger's beautiful flowing game~~~

It was obvious that Djoke wasn't trying to do a real imitation of
Roger's strokes, which he could've done.

His goal was to disrespect him by making his strokes look feminine or
whatever, probably because his coach
has been telling him that the reason Roger was so dominant was because
players like Blake, Ljubo, etc. were too much in awe of him.


  
Date: 17 Dec 2008 11:23:22
From: Iceberg
Subject: Re: Most distinctive, *mimicable* strokes of Open Era
"Jason Catlin" <jason-catlin@hotmail.com > wrote in message
news:12d3d4cc-bb1f-4655-9c4f-0286985e19d1@x14g2000yqk.googlegroups.com...
On Dec 16, 11:10 pm, "Stapler" <stap...@tmp.com > wrote:
> andrew.r...@gmail.com wrote:
> > On Dec 16, 8:56 am, mimus <tinmimu...@hotmail.com> wrote:
> >> On Tue, 16 Dec 2008 08:41:13 -0800, Jason Catlin wrote:
> >>> In his impersonations, Djoke was great at capturing all the
> >>> mannerisms of the various top players.
>
> >> His imitation of Sharapova sucked.
>
> >> --
>
> >> Take a deep breath, take a walk, cool off, plot a bit, and serve
> >> again.
>
> > His Federer imitation was beautiful.
>
> It's impossible to imitate Roger's beautiful flowing game~~~
>
>It was obvious that Djoke wasn't trying to do a real imitation of
>Roger's strokes, which he could've done.
>
>His goal was to disrespect him by making his strokes look feminine or
>whatever, probably because his coach
>has been telling him that the reason Roger was so dominant was because
>players like Blake, Ljubo, etc. were too much in awe of him.

Murray and Canas proved this to be the case!




 
Date: 16 Dec 2008 14:48:33
From: andrew.reys@gmail.com
Subject: Re: Most distinctive, *mimicable* strokes of Open Era
On Dec 16, 8:56 am, mimus <tinmimu...@hotmail.com > wrote:
> On Tue, 16 Dec 2008 08:41:13 -0800, Jason Catlin wrote:
> > In his impersonations, Djoke was great at capturing all the mannerisms
> > of the various top players.
>
> His imitation of Sharapova sucked.
>
> --
>
> Take a deep breath, take a walk, cool off, plot a bit, and serve again.

His Federer imitation was beautiful.


  
Date: 17 Dec 2008 04:10:33
From: Stapler
Subject: Re: Most distinctive, *mimicable* strokes of Open Era
andrew.reys@gmail.com wrote:
> On Dec 16, 8:56 am, mimus <tinmimu...@hotmail.com> wrote:
>> On Tue, 16 Dec 2008 08:41:13 -0800, Jason Catlin wrote:
>>> In his impersonations, Djoke was great at capturing all the
>>> mannerisms of the various top players.
>>
>> His imitation of Sharapova sucked.
>>
>> --
>>
>> Take a deep breath, take a walk, cool off, plot a bit, and serve
>> again.
>
> His Federer imitation was beautiful.

It's impossible to imitate Roger's beautiful flowing game~~~




 
Date: 16 Dec 2008 11:56:52
From: mimus
Subject: Re: Most distinctive, *mimicable* strokes of Open Era
On Tue, 16 Dec 2008 08:41:13 -0800, Jason Catlin wrote:

> In his impersonations, Djoke was great at capturing all the mannerisms
> of the various top players.

His imitation of Sharapova sucked.

--

Take a deep breath, take a walk, cool off, plot a bit, and serve again.